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Ten Pound Poms!
Old 10th October 2009, 01:15 AM   #1
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Default Ten Pound Poms!

How simple was the immigration process in the 1950s!

See attached document - George Hazlehurst’s application to migrate to Australia with his family as part of the ‘ten-pound poms’ scheme. The Hazlehursts arrived in Melbourne in July 1951.

Immigration officer's comments - "Good average family. Joining friends in Victoria. At present in insurance. Hopes to take up broadcasting and production work. Medical arranged."

Stamped: C of A Department of Immigration London
Recommended: A. Insurance Agent
Signature of Interviewing Officer:..........
.
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File Type: pdf Ten Pound Pom.pdf (89.8 KB, 654 views)

Last edited by Migration Help; 12th October 2009 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 12th October 2009, 03:43 PM   #2
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Sorry all!! It has just been brought to my attention that I did not upload the picture of the ten pound pom application. Picture now there for all to see.
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Old 12th October 2009, 03:56 PM   #3
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I would love to hear some 10 pound pom stories about how life was so different then!
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Old 13th October 2009, 12:38 AM   #4
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Hi Jo

Yes it would be very interesting to hear some real life stories about those times. The Immigration Museum has a lot of information about this time in Aussie history - check out some of their exhibits at http://museumvictoria.com.au/immigrationmuseum/.
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Question: What was the “Ten Pound Pom” scheme?
Old 13th October 2009, 12:40 AM   #5
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Default Question: What was the “Ten Pound Pom” scheme?

Answer: The “Ten Pound Pom” scheme is the colloquial name for an assisted migration scheme that operated in Australia after World War II. In spite of its name, this scheme was not limited to those from the United Kingdom but was open to citizens of all Commonwealth countries. (The word “Pom” meant English people, and was sometimes used in a derogatory manner.)

Adult migrants were charged ₤10 for their fare and children travelled for free. They were drawn by promises of employment and housing, a more relaxed lifestyle and a better climate.

“Ten Pound Poms” needed to be in sound health and under the age of 45 years. There were initially no skill restrictions, although under the “White Australia” policy those from mixed race backgrounds found it very difficult to take advantage of the scheme. At one point in 1947, more than 400,000 Brits were registered at Australia House in London for the scheme.

The aim of the scheme was to substantially increase Australia’s population in response to fears of a Japanese invasion, and a new awareness of Australia’s vulnerability and unrealised economic potential as an under-populated country. The “Populate or Perish” policy was developed by the Curtin Government before the end of World War II.

By late 1944 the Australian Government had begun negotiations with Britain for assisted immigration programs in the post-war years. Since all Australian political parties supported the “White Australia” policy they looked to Britain and northern European countries for immigrants in the belief that people from these countries would more easily assimilate with the Australian community. After the war, Australia gradually extended assisted passage schemes to immigrants from other countries such as the Netherlands and Italy to maintain high levels of immigration. It also welcomed refugees from war-torn Europe.

Sometimes the promises to immigrants were not realised. Many migrants faced lengthy stays in migrant hostels, failed to get ideal employment or missed their old communities. Around one quarter of the “Ten Pound Poms” left Australia within a few years of their arrival.

The year 1969 was the peak year for the scheme, with more than 80,000 people coming to Australia. In 1973, the cost of assisted passages was increased to ₤75 per family. This was still a very cheap fare, but numbers of assisted migrants from the United Kingdom dropped off significantly. Assisted passage schemes were gradually phased out in the 1980s, having profoundly influenced the ethnic and cultural makeup of the Australian population.

(Thanks to the Immigration Museum for this information)
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Old 13th October 2009, 09:16 PM   #6
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I can't imagine how tough it must have been for these guys,, and we think we have it hard with the internet at our finger tips! lol
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Old 14th October 2009, 02:54 AM   #7
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In some ways it would have been tougher on those early migrants than we have it today (I don't think I could do without the internet or mobile phones!).

But heck, look at all you had to do to be granted PR back then!! How easy was that?
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Wrigglers in the Water
Old 17th May 2010, 04:27 PM   #8
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Default Wrigglers in the Water

I'm not too sure on the Japanese Invasion reasoning but certainly increasing the population of Australia was desired, there being many major infrastructure projects requiring workers; coal fired power stations and hydro electric schemes, dams and irrigation systems to mention a few and the massive Snowy Mountains Hydro Electric Scheme being to the fore.

Workers were housed in tents for lengthy periods until more substantial accommodation was erected, that requiring workers too.
The numbers involved and lack of housing did give rise in urban areas to Immigration hostels that were of the old army style curved corrugated iron roof style, but better than a tent.
Work on major infrastructure projects were not close to cities and so where there were requirements for workers in more remote locations and the tents being used, they were single men locations and could have even meant families of some men remaining in Immigration Hostels.

I spent some of my 1950s childhood in the Latrobe Valley, Victorias powerhouse and can recall many immigrant children but housing seemed to be more normal from memory even if assimilation didn't always happen in the friendliest of ways.

Part of my later childhood was spent in the Dandenong ranges just to east of Melbourne and these days surrounded by the outer suburban sprawl whereas half a century ago there was a lot more farmland and forests.

Our small village of Sassafras had a few Brits and one family I will probably never foreget for this one particular reason was their discovery of wrigglers in the water , we all being on tank water and perhaps most Dandenongs residents still are.
The wrigglers were Mosquito larvae and from memory hardly noticeable to us regular drinkers.

Cannot remember if it was ever sufficient cause for them to see about a passage back but they were sure less than impressed!
A couple of sites that have some good information, Wiki of course and then even DIAC itself.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Pound_Poms
http://www.immi.gov.au/media/fact-sheets/04fifty.htm
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Old 20th May 2010, 09:29 PM   #9
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Thanks digger, the sites you point out have good information on this topic.
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Old 19th June 2010, 05:47 PM   #10
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I was on the boat in 1970 from Southhamton, we went to NZ I was on the fairsky in 1970 , if i can help you I will.

http://hubpages.com/hub/where-are-th...e-Fairsky-1970
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